Kanu o ka `Äina Learning `Ohana. 64-1043 Hi'iaka Street, Hālau Ho`olako. PO Box 6511 Kamuela, HI 96743. Phone: 808-887-1117 Fax: 808-887-0030...

Kaho‘iwai

Teacher Certification

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If you need a transcript for Hälau Wänana or Kaho`iwai please contact Joe Fraser (joef@kalo.org)
 
Scheduled Teacher Programs
Applications for 2019 is now OPEN. Prospective students may submit an expression of interest at any time using the 'Admission tab', 'how to apply'.
 
The teacher education programs are scheduled for 2019, 2020, and April 2021. Each program provides scholarships for 20 students including textbooks and some travel for residential. Students will also be required to work with Native Hawaiian `Äina-Based community programs throughout the program. The program is for applicants that live in the State of Hawai'i. Priority is given to those currently working in a school with Hawaiian children. Attendance for a weekend at the start of each term is required for successful applicants as is the completion of Praxis requirements (if you do not have a degree in the field of teaching). 
 
The teacher certification program is an 18 month, 31.5 credit point (secondary) course of study with a blend of residential, online, and field-based work. The elementary program is 32 credits and 2-years duration. Kaho`iwai has Hawai`i State approval to deliver teacher education programs with a focus on grades 6-12 in the areas of Math, English, Science, Social Studies and Hawaiian Studies and K-6.
 
The program is a hybrid in which students meet for a residential period and then complete requirements using an online learning system. The program has the capacity to undertake this type of approach using information technology resources and instructors with significant experience in computer-based training, distance, and online programs. 
 
Candidates in the program may be awarded a full-tuition scholarship base on acceptance of program requirements.
 

Academic Calendar


 

2018-19

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

Term Dates

01 July

01 October

01 January

01 April

First Day of Instruction

02 July

01 October

01 January

01 April

Last day of Instruction

30 September

31 December

31 March

30 June

Residential Dates

Kamole

September 21-23

January 4-6

March 22-24

June 21-23

Residential Dates

Cohort 6

 

 

March 8-10

June 7-9

Last day to withdraw

End of Week 6

End of Week 6

End of Week 6

End of Week 6

Drop Course

End of Week 4

End of Week 4

End of Week 4

End of Week 4

Graduation

 

Saturday 13 October

 

 

Cohort Start

 

 

 

Cohort 5

Grades Published

October 10

January 10

April 10

July 10

Kaho’iwai reserves the right to make changes to this calendar at any time.

Grades may be published earlier. Students are advised to check for updates in Populi

2019-2020

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

Term Dates

01 July

01 October

01 January

01 April

First Day of Instruction

July 1

Oct 1

Jan 6

Apr 6

Last day of Instruction

30 June

31 December

31 March

30 June

Residential Dates

Kamole

September 21-23

January 4-6

 

 

Cohort 6

September 13-15

January 10-12

March 13-15

 

Cohort 7

 

 

March 27-29

June 26-28

Last day to withdraw

End of Week 6

End of Week 6

End of Week 6

End of Week 6

Drop Course

End of Week 4

End of Week 4

End of Week 4

End of Week 4

Graduation

 

Saturday 12 October

 

 

Grades Published

October 10

January 10

April 10

July 10

Residential Dates for Cohort 6

  •      March 8-10
  •      June 7-9
  •      September 13-15
  •      January 10-12
  •      March 13-15
  •      June 12-14, 2020
  •      Sep 11-13, 2020
  •      Jan 8-12, 2021

Programs

Post Baccalaureate Certificate of Teaching (PBCT) Program Description

The Kaho’iwai program produces candidates who seek to work in Hawaiian-focused charter schools; candidates who demonstrate the knowledge skills and values to meet the needs of Native Hawaiian children in education. Students can elect the secondary (6-12) or elementary (K-6) fields.

Secondary

Kaho`iwai delivers a 31.5 credit point Secondary (6-12) program – a Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Teaching. This program aims to graduate secondary (6-12) teachers including Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, English, and Hawaiian Studies. As a state-approved teacher education program, graduates are able to apply for licensing upon program completion. Kaho’iwai is accredited with the World Indigenous Nations Higher Education Consortium (WINHEC) for ten years from 8/21/2018-8/21/2028.

Elementary

The two-year 32 credit point Elementary Program (including 15 credits of fieldwork and clinical experience) aims to graduate elementary (6-12) teachers. As a state-approved teacher education program, graduates are able to apply for licensing upon program completion.

Admission requirements (PBCT)

  1.       Minimum of a bachelor’s degree from a US accredited institution recognized by CHEA (or an international degree evaluated as comparable by a member of the (NACES) or the Association of International Credentials Evaluators (AICE).
  2.       If not a graduate of a US High School or college, an IELTS score of 6.0 is required (or other measures as outlined in the English language Proficiency Policy
  3.       Completion of State Praxis requirements (as required)
  4.       Successful completion of interview and writing activities
  5.       Min 2.5 GPA (bachelor’s degree)
  6.       Must be over 18-years of age and verify ID
  7.       Must have access to a computer and internet that can use Coursesites and the Microsoft Office suite of programs
  8.       Must be able to attend in-residence programs each term
  9.       Preference is given to those employed in a Hawaiian Focused Charter School.

Graduation Requirements

Graduation requirements for the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate of Teaching (PBCT) include:

  •       Successfully complete all program coursework requirements.
  •       Successfully complete practicum placement and associated requirements.
  •       Successfully complete student teaching and associated requirements.
  •       Successful completion of professional portfolio.
  •       Successful completion of a community journal
  •       Evidence of content in the teaching field (Academic transcripts or Praxis II).
  •       Min overall GPA of 3.0

English Language Proficiency Policy

An applicant with transcripts from a country other than the USA is to provide a transcript evaluation from a member of NACES or AICE.

This evaluation is to be provided with a copy of undergraduate and graduate transcripts. Applicants are to provide formal identification when applying for entry to the program. The English language assessment documents are to be recorded on the student file checklist.

The following is accepted:

  1. Prospective students whose native language is not English and who have not earned a degree from an appropriately accredited institution where English is the principal language of instruction must demonstrate college-level proficiency in English through one of the following for admission:
  2. Undergraduate Degree: A minimum score of 500 on the paper-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL PBT), or 61 on the Internet Based Test (iBT), a 6.0 on the International English Language Test (IELTS), or 44 on the Pearson Test of English Academic Score Report. A high school diploma completed at an accredited/recognized high school (where the medium of instruction is English).
  3. Master’s Degree: A minimum score of 530 on the paper-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL PBT), or 71 on the Internet Based Test (iBT), a 6.5 on the International English Language Test (IELTS), or 50 on the Pearson Test of English Academic Score Report.
  4. First Professional Degree or Professional Doctoral Degree: A minimum score of 550 on the paper-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL PBT), or 80 on the Internet Based Test (iBT), a 6.5 on the International English Language Test (IELTS), or 58 on the Pearson Test of English Academic Score Report.
  5. A minimum score on the College Board Accuplacer ESL Exam Series as follows: ESL Language Use: Score of 85 ESL Listening: Score of 80 ESL Reading: Score of 85 ESL Sentence Meaning: Score of 90 ESL Writeplacer: Score of 4 Comprehensive Score for all exams of 350
  6. A minimum grade of Pre-1 on the Eiken English Proficiency Exam;
  7. A minimum B-2 English proficiency level identified within the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) standards and assessed through various ESOL examinations, including the University of Cambridge;
  8. A transcript indicating completion of at least 30 semester credit hours with an average grade of “C” or higher at an institution accredited by an agency recognized by the United States Secretary of Education and/or the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), or, accepted foreign equivalent that is listed in the International Handbook of Universities where the language of instruction was English. A “B” or higher is required for a master’s degree, first professional degree, or professional doctoral degree.
  9. Transcripts not in English must be evaluated by an appropriate third party and translated into English or evaluated by a trained transcript evaluator fluent in the language on the transcript. In this case, the evaluator must have expertise in the educational practices of the country of origin and include an English translation of the review

Course Listing

EDU401 Introduction to Teaching (1 credit)

The course provides an introduction to teaching contextualized by the HTSB Teacher Professional standards, use of dispositions and Kauhale principles, curriculum and the Hawaiian Focused Charter School environment. It will provide an opportunity for candidates to build their philosophical approach to teaching and an understanding of the school environment.

EDU402 Child Development, Teaching, and Learning (2 credit)

This course also provides candidates with the knowledge, skills, and disposition to become informed, reflective and pedagogically proficient teachers. This course will allow candidates to demonstrate their commitment to the profession, recognize the role of teachers in developing a positive environment for teaching and learning; communicate effectively with pupils, colleagues and members of the wider school community; and, evaluate the factors that promote and hinder effective learning and apply this knowledge to develop effective and creative assessment, teaching, and learning practices.

EDU403 Instructional Strategies (1 credit)

This course focuses on integrating instructional strategies and concepts within the context of planning and implementing a student-centered curriculum through the research, identification, and application of appropriate instructional strategies, methods, concepts, and techniques. Instructional strategies are directly linked to the curriculum, desired student outcomes, classroom assessments, and reflect learner needs and interests.

EDU404 Teaching K-6 Methods (Language Arts/Reading) (1 credit)

This course is a study of methods, techniques, materials, technology, state standards, and current research related to elementary school language arts and reading instruction.

EDU406 Assessment (1 credit)

This course will focus on fundamental concepts of educational assessment for classroom teachers including the relationship of assessment to educational aims, quality of assessment, assessment and technology, principles of item construction, evaluation of student responses, interpretation of results, and improvement of techniques.

EDU407 Teaching in Multicultural Environments (2 credit)

Hawai`i is a complex, multi-racial and isolated environment which can appear contradictory. This course provides candidates with an understanding of the cultural, environmental, leadership, educational, and historical context of working in Hawai`i. Legal and ethical issues relating to schools is examined through case studies. Tools for effective communication and conflict resolution are provided.

EDU408 Teaching K-6 Methods (Health/PE) (1 credit)

This course is a study of methods, techniques, materials, technology, state standards, and current research related to elementary school language arts and reading instruction.

EDU409 History of Education (1 credit)

This course reflects the history of American education.  It treats the changing character of education in the context of broader social and cultural environs. The course provides knowledge of the history of American education and an appreciation of historical perspectives as ways of understanding contemporary education.

EDU410 Teaching K-6 Methods (Social Studies) (1 credit)

This course is a study of methods, techniques, materials, technology, state standards, and current research related to elementary school language arts and reading instruction.

EDU411 ELL Learners & Exceptional Learners (1 credit)

This course will introduce the concept of and methods for instructing elementary-age students with diverse needs. It includes the study of how a learner-centered approach to teaching can provide English Language Learners and Exceptional Learners with a greater opportunity to interact meaningfully with educational materials as they learn the subject matter. Coursework includes an overview of differentiated methods and techniques used for the identification, assessment, and instruction of diverse populations; English language acquisition approaches appropriate for diverse cultures; and research-based instructional activities and lesson planning with implementation models.

EDU412 Teaching K-6 Methods (Science) (1 credit)

This course is a study of methods, techniques, materials, technology, state standards, and current research related to elementary school language arts and reading instruction.

EDU413 Special Education (1 credit)

Candidates will understand the nature and causes, psychological/behavioral characteristics, and educational approaches concerning persons with disabilities. This will include legal issues, behavior management plans and the impact of disabilities on the individual, family, and community.

EDU414 Teaching K-6 Methods (Math) (1 credit)

This course is a study of methods, techniques, materials, technology, state standards, and current research related to elementary school language arts and reading instruction.

EDU415 Diagnosis & Remediation of Reading Difficulties (1 credit)

This course focuses on the use of reading assessments in determining classroom instructional and intervention strategies. It provides foundational information on reading acquisition stages, factors that impact reading success and failure, and strategies to address reading difficulties.

EDU416 Teaching K-6 Methods (Fine Arts-Music) (1 credit)

This course is a study of methods, techniques, materials, technology, state standards, and current research related to elementary school language arts and reading instruction.

EDU405 Teaching Practicum - 3 weeks (a), (b), (c) (2.5 credits each)

The Practicum is the application of teaching theory to practice in the classroom. It is designed to integrate theory to practice and formally reflect on the process and content of teaching. It also allows for mentoring throughout the experience. The practicum will integrate content from co-requisites for each term. Candidates will facilitate and inspire student learning and creativity. Candidates use their knowledge of subject matter, teaching and learning, and technology to facilitate experiences that advance student learning, creativity, and innovation in school environments.

EDU417 Residency- 10 weeks (7.5 credits)

The residency provides the practical application of teaching in Charter school environments. Completed in conjunction with the residency seminar, the course provides a 10-week placement in the Candidate field of teaching area.

Secondary Scope and Sequence

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

Term 5

Term 6

Child Development

ELL

 

SPED

 

Assessment

 

Multiculturalism

 

Student Teaching

Intro to Teaching

Methods

History

 

 

 

 

Practicum

Practicum

Practicum

Practicum

Practicum

 

Prac Seminar

Prac Seminar

Prac Seminar

Prac Seminar

Prac Seminar

 

Elementary Scope and Sequence

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

Term 5

Term 6

Term 7

Term 8

Child Development

ELL

 

SPED

 

Assessment

 

Multiculturalism

 

Reading Diagnosis

 

Instructional Strategies

 

Student Teaching

Intro to Teaching

Methods

History

 

Science Meth

 

Math Meth

Art Meth

 

 

ELA Meth

 

Health Meth

 

Soc Stud Meth

 

 

 

 

 

Practicum

 

Practicum

 

Practicum

 

 

Grading System

Grading follows a criterion-based system with results published using the following descriptors.

 

Final Result Grade

Range Guide (%)

Descriptor

A

91-100

 

B

81-90

 

C

71 - 80

 

D

61-70

Fail

F

0- 60

Fail

Pass / Fail (ungraded)

 

Attainment of the learning outcomes as per the unit outline (or not).

I (incomplete)

 

Work outstanding due to issues outside of the student’s control.

W

(withdrawn)

 

Student has withdrawn from the course without grade

TX

 

Credit Transfer

 

We use Grade Point Averages (GPAs) as a tool for measuring the proficiency of our students and supporting our claims about our program.  At Kahoÿiwai students receive grades in each course to denote mastery of the subject. Grades are ordered conventionally such that the top grade a student may receive is an “A” and the bottom grade is an “F”. Each letter grade corresponds to a numerical grade or points (see chart below).  Program courses also have corresponding hours such that successful completion of a course earns a student a set amount of hours.

 

Table 6. Grading / GPA scale

Letter Grade

Numerical Grade

A

4

B

3

C

2

D

1

F

0

 

In order to calculate GPA our program multiplies the numerical course grade by the number of hours received for each course, adds up the total number of points awarded, and divides that number by the total number of hours taken.  The value generated by this formula produces the student’s overall GPA.  For example, a student who took four classes and received two “As” and two “Bs” would have a GPA of 3.5.

We selected this tool because GPA is a commonly-used measure of academic performance.  Students who have high GPAs tend to have a better command of content knowledge and can demonstrate this knowledge on testable measures (Bacon and Bean, 2006; Clark, 1964; Gore, 2006).  In fact, Kaho’iwai requires that students have an overall GPA of 3.0 or greater in order to successfully complete the teaching certification program.  Moderation and staff training will be used to determine consistency in grading.


 

Policies

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education.

FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children's education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are "eligible students."

  •        Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the student's education records maintained by the school. Schools are not required to provide copies of records unless, for reasons such as great distance, it is impossible for parents or eligible students to review the records. Schools may charge a fee for copies.
  •        Parents or eligible students have the right to request that a school correct records which they believe to be inaccurate or misleading. If the school decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student then has the right to a formal hearing. After the hearing, if the school still decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student has the right to place a statement with the record setting forth his or her view about the contested information.
  •        Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student's education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31):
    • School officials with legitimate educational interest;
    • Other schools to which a student is transferring;
    • Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes;
    • Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student;
    • Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school;
    • Accrediting organizations;
    • To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena; 
    • Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and
    • State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law.

Schools may disclose, without consent, "directory" information such as a student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance. However, schools must tell parents and eligible students about directory information and allow parents and eligible students a reasonable amount of time to request that the school not disclose directory information about them. Schools must notify parents and eligible students annually of their rights under FERPA. The actual means of notification (special letter, inclusion in a PTA bulletin, student handbook, or newspaper article) is left to the discretion of each school.

For additional information, you may call 1-800-USA-LEARN (1-800-872-5327) (voice).

Individuals who use TDD may use the Federal Relay Service.

Or you may contact us at the following address:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20202-8520

Plagiarism and Academic Misconduct

Ua Mau Ka Ea O Ka Aina I Ka Pono as a Hawaiian value encompasses the notions of academic integrity in Kahoÿiwai. Academic integrity covers actions such as plagiarism and misconduct as it relates to the academic environment.

Students are expected to act with honesty and transparency in the development and delivery of their work in the program. Students are required to ensure that all submissions are their own original work following the guidelines presented by instructors.

Tools available to support students include the use of online programs such as Grammarly, the APA manual and resources available online, and support from program faculty.

Plagiarism refers to the use of other`s work without providing credit in the text. As a general rule all work submitted in Kahoÿiwai should follow the conventions outlined in the American Psychological Association`s writing guide (most recent edition).

Academic misconduct refers to attempts to obtain an unfair academic advantage. This could include, buying test answers or assignments, colluding with others in the production of work, sharing others work or providing others with work when not collaborating, resubmitting previously assessed work, or fabricating results. Other examples may also demonstrate academic misconduct. If you are unsure of what might constitute plagiarism or misconduct, ask a faculty member.

Faculty are required to check student work against databases for plagiarism and all incidences of suspected plagiarism and misconduct are to be reported. The following provides guidance for issues relating to student integrity.

 

Breach

Corrective Action

First incidence of plagiarism or misconduct

Counseling and training/support provided to the student. The student may be required to retake the assessment task.

Second incidence of Plagiarism or misconduct

The student will fail and be required to re-take the course

Third incidence of plagiarism or misconduct

The student will be suspended from the program and required to competitively reapply if seeking re-entry.

 

Students may appeal decisions using the Kaho’iwai appeals process.

 

Student Appeals Process

The following process is used by students to lodge appeals to actions taken by the program.

  1. If a student is not satisfied with an action taken in regards to issues arising they can lodge an appeal with the Appeals Committee within 7 calendar days of receiving the notification.
  2. Should the student find procedural issues arising from the decision they may appeal to the Appeals Committee by writing to the program manager within 7 calendar days of notification.
  3. The program manager will convene an Appeals Committee which will include three members of Kaho’iwai staff and/or faculty. The Appeals Committee shall review the findings and recommendations of the program manager to ensure procedures were followed. The Appeals Committee shall not conduct a new factual investigation or overturn any factual findings contained in the report unless they are clearly erroneous. The committee shall issue a written decision within 10 calendar days of receiving the appeal. A copy of the decision shall be sent to the student and program manager.
  4. Should the student be dissatisfied with the appeals process they can ask the VP Academic and Student Services (in writing within 7 days of the appeals committee report) to review the Appeals Committee decision. The VP Academic is to review the process only and his/her decision is final.
  5. This will end the appeals process.

Credit Hour Policy

  1.       Credit point hours are written into internal accreditation documents for each program offered.
  2.       Kaho’iwai uses Quarter hour credits.
    1.       Quarter credit points are based on a formula of 30-hours work per 1 credit point hour in a quarter. This includes 10 hours of instructor contact and 20 hours of preparation related to the course.
  3.       Credit can be allocated for work that is:
    1.       instructor delivered;
    2.       online;
    3.       student based;
    4.       research based;
    5.       classroom based;
    6.       lab based;
    7.       or any combination of activities including practicum and internships.
  4.       Hours are to be rounded down in 0.25-hour increments. For example, 1.35 credit hours of work is to be recorded as 1.25 credit hours. Hours are not to be rounded up.
  5.       Credit point hours procedure is based on DEAC community practice.
  6.       Transfer of Credit. Credit transfer is at the discretion of the receiving institution. KALO will assess course/program objective to ensure alignment with KALO programs before accepting applicants into programs. For transfer to other institutions, students should consider their long-term educational goals and the policies of those institutions.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

Kaho`iwai does not offer financial aid to students. Satisfactory academic progress (SAP) is used to define successful completion of coursework to maintain progression within the program. Failing to meet standards for satisfactory progression is discussed below.

Qualitative standard:

Represented by your grade point average (GPA). You must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA for each program in the catalog. Minimum cumulative GPA for graduation is 3.0. Students who fail to achieve a course GPA of 3.0 are required to take GCE499 (independent study) aligned to the course to meet minimum GPA requirements.

Quantitative standard:

This standard has two parts.

  • First, you must complete your degree or certificate program within a maximum timeframe, which may vary according to your student status and program. For the PBCT this timeframe is 200%
  • Second, you must successfully complete a required percentage of the credits you attempt. This component is referred to as your credit completion ratio. Credit completion ratio is 75%. After the first term, a student must maintain a 75% completion ratio with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Students are also required to attend all residential activities as outlined in the enrolment contract.

Military service

If you are required to withdraw for military reasons, credit completion and maximum timeframe requirements will be waived for the semester of your official withdrawal.

Your right to appeal

A notice will be sent to your e-mail account on record if you are not meeting SAP standards. You may appeal your suspension status, if:

  • Your record shows that you earned the required GPA or credit completion ratio to meet SAP standards during a term at your own expense.
  • You were readmitted after suspension.
  • unusual circumstances interfered with your ability to meet SAP standards, including but not limited to:
    • Illness, accident, or injury experienced by you or a significant person in your life. Documentation required: physician's statement, police report, or other documentation from a third-party professional; hospital billing statement
    • Death of a family member or significant person in your life. Documentation required: a copy of the obituary or death certificate
    • Divorce experienced by you or parent. Documentation required: attorney's letter on law firm's letterhead or a copy of the divorce decree
    • Reinstatement after academic dismissal or extended break in your enrollment. Documentation required: adviser's written statement
    • Personal problems or issues with your spouse, family, roommate, or other significant people. Documentation required: a written statement from a medical doctor, counselor, attorney, or professional adviser

If you have been placed on suspension, your scholarship may be canceled. For that reason, your best interest is served by submitting an appeal as soon as you receive your suspension notice. After your appeal is received, you will be notified by e-mail within 15 business days on whether your appeal was granted or denied.

Academic suspension

You may be suspended if you fail to meet satisfactory academic progress (SAP) or academic standards set by your program. If you have been suspended from Kaho`iwai, you are no longer eligible for enrolment for one year and may lose your Kaho`iwai scholarship. Readmission to the program is by re-application.

Probation

You may be placed on probation if your credit ratio falls below 75%, if you do not maintain satisfactory achievement on the Kauhale values rubric, or if you miss residential activity without being excused. Failure to attain the required GPA, Kauhale standard, and/or credit completion ratio can result in program suspension or loss of scholarship.

Timeframe reminder

Once your record shows you have attempted more than 150 percent of your degree or certificate credit requirements you will receive a timeframe reminder in your email account. This is meant to inform you that you are approaching your maximum timeframe. You are still eligible for progression but may want to plan your coursework to complete your degree within the maximum timeframe. If you exceed the timeframe before you have finished your studies, you may be required to use your own funds to continue your studies.

PBCT students:

To appeal your suspension due to any of these or similar personal crises, explain your circumstances in writing to the program manager. Students have 10 days in which to lodge a written appeal.

Credit transfer policy

There are no credit transfer opportunities established with other Higher Education Institutions at present. Credit Transfer is at the discretion of the gaining institution. Students who have completed coursework at other accredited institutions may apply to the Kaho’iwai program manager for credit transfer.

Tuition, fees, scholarship, and refund policy

The actual program cost (PBCT) is $750 per credit, however, the program is providing significant private scholarship to students. Tuition is $0 but there is a $50 admissions fee and a $50 graduation fee. All student travel, meals, and accommodation associated with the program are covered although students may be required to buy textbooks. If students are required to buy textbooks it will be stated in the enrolment agreement.

Introduction

Kaho`iwai is dedicated to maintaining an institution that manages and enforces the fair collection of fees and tuition based on student attendance in the program.

Purpose of Policy

The fees and tuition collected by the institution should include a fair and concise process for which students, participants, and the institution needs are dealt with in a just manner.

Scope of Policy

The policy applies to all individuals who are enrolled in Kaho`iwai Programs.

Definitions

Business Day Business days are defined as Monday through Friday, excluding posted holidays.

Drop Class

Students are to maintain a set course of study. In order for the student to complete the teacher program, he or she must attend all program events.

i) If the student is not able to attend all or a significant part of the course activities they will be considered absent and must make up their attendance and course work missed.

ii) It is the responsibility of the program manager and the course instructor to determine the type and amount of course work to be issued to the student to satisfy their absence from a course activity. The issued course work will be approved by the program manager.

iii) All program requirements must be met before the student can be completed.

Withdrawal

Students are allowed to withdraw from courses at any time. Withdrawal forms are available from student services.

Total Withdrawal

Withdrawal from courses. Students who withdraw from the program will be issued a W. No refunds are granted for withdrawals from the program.

Policy Statement

Payment Policy It is the policy of Kaho`iwai that all expenses, including tuition and fees, are due and are to be paid by each student at the time of registration or as otherwise indicated

The Payment of Tuition Fees

(i) It is the student’s personal responsibility to ensure that tuition and fees are paid and cleared on time.

(ii) Tuition fees are due and payable as promulgated to be paid by a sponsor, such as an Employer or on a student’s behalf.

Sanctions for late or nonpayment of fees:

i) If a payment is late or defaulted upon, the institution may apply immediate sanctions.

(a) No admission to examinations. These may include:

(b) Refusal to receive assessed work. No access to references, degree certificates, and transcripts.

(ii) On applying sanctions, the institution will send a letter to the student at their registered address seeking payment in full, including any administration charge, within 12 working days of the date of the letter. Where payment in full is made and cleared within 12 working days, all sanctions will be lifted.

(iii)Where payment is not made and cleared within 12 working days, the program may terminate the students registration with the institution with immediate effect.

(iv) If the student wishes to continue with the courses then he/she will need to re-apply.

Changes to the student’s seminar attendance prior to the start of the seminar.

i) A student who wishes to be absent or withdraw from a course prior to the start of the seminar should contact the program manager in the first instance.

Members of Staff:

i) If the change involves suspension of study or withdrawal, the program manager will make arrangements for the students request to be dealt with by the Admissions and Progressions sub-committee to determine the way forward. The committee will advise the program manager of any agreed changes to the student’s registration.

Complaints

If a student is unhappy about a decision concerning payment of tuition fees or the accuracy of the fee determined, including the termination of registration with the institution, he or she may bring a complaint to the program manager.

Refund

Students Granted a Refund under the Following Conditions

(i) If injury or illness requiring extensive hospital and/or convalescent care prohibits a student’s return to classes within the term, a full course refund of tuition will result. Official documentation regarding the medical condition or emergency situation is required

ii) In case of death, a full refund of tuition shall be made.

iii) If a student is called for active duty in the armed forces of the United States a full refund of tuition may be approved. A copy of the official call up letter to active duty is required.

Students are denied refund under the following conditions

(i) Uninformed absence, Withdrawal, Total Withdrawal or Incomplete status of the program.

(ii) No refunds for course fees are granted unless the student withdraws from the course prior to the first scheduled session.

Refunds are issued by check and mailed to the student’s permanent address within three weeks of drop class.

Any refund of tuition fees of a student who is sponsored will be returned to the sponsor, not to the student.

Policy Application

Any individual who registers and/or participates as a student in the institution are subject to the above policy in its entirety.

Review

The VP-Academics is responsible for implementing, reviewing and promulgating this Policy to all relevant staff.

Discounts and Collection Policies

No discounts are provided to students in Kaho’iwai. The program does not institute collection procedures against students.

Student Identification

Student identity verification is initiated during the admissions process to confirm that the admitted student who participates in and completes coursework and assessments is the same student who is awarded credit.

Persons applying to Kaho’iwai programs will provide identification documents to validate their identity. These documents can include:

  •        State Driver’s License
  •        US Passport
  •        Permanent Resident Visa card
  •        Birth Certificate

Once verified confirmation of student identity is recorded on the student file.

The Student Identity Verification Policy applies to all courses or programs offered by KALO.  Students are formally identified during the application process and verified at orientation.  The process continues through graduation, transfer, or withdrawal from the institution.

All interactions with students are verified use of a variety of methods including but not limited to:

Physical verification on admission to the program

A secure login and authentication process for electronic communication and teaching and learning interactions;

Other technologies and practices that are effective in verifying student identification.

To ensure appropriate and secure access to online learning platforms and the Student Information System, enrolled students are responsible for providing complete information about themselves in any identity verification process. Confidentiality is important in this process and all efforts are made to abide by the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and any other applicable laws or regulations.

All users of the Leaning Management System and Student Information System and email are responsible for maintaining the security of usernames, passwords, and any other assigned access credentials, and are responsible for changing passwords periodically to maintain security.

 The VP-Academics of Academic and Student Services is responsible for ensuring university-wide compliance with the provisions of this policy.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Students accepted into an academic program at the institution have certain rights and responsibilities that help to establish a student code of professional conduct. Foremost to this code is student access to a learning environment free from harmful interference.

  1.       Students have the right to an objective evaluation of their academic performance.
  2.       Students shall receive the course syllabus outlining the objectives, coursework, and the methods of assessment that determine final grades by the start of the course.
  3.       Students are responsible to actively participate in and complete program requirements.
  4.       Students have the right to quality education. This right includes access to and the inclusion of appropriate instructional strategies and methodologies, adequate materials, quality instructors, and a learning environment that stimulates creativity and personal growth.
  5.       Students will be treated in a respectful manner aligning to program values.   
  6.       Students have the responsibility to conduct themselves in a professional manner throughout the program and to abide by the institutional policies.
  7.       Students are responsible to practice, uphold, and perpetuate the values representing the institution and programs.
  8.       Students will be notified of infractions and have the right to respond to disciplinary sanctions.
  9.       Students have the right to form and uphold personal perspectives of data or views covered in the course, but they are responsible for learning the academic content presented.
  10.        Students have a right and the responsibility to participate in the evaluation of courses and instructors. Students are expected to provide constructive criticism of institution services received.

Student Code of Conduct

It is expected that students will display program values at all times. Behavior that is unacceptable includes academic misconduct (plagiarism, collusion, and cheating), behavior that breaches federal and state laws, and failing to abide by policies applying to KALO such as (but not limited to) use of facilities and services. Students are required to follow all directions from staff and faculty.

Program Values

  •       Aloha kekahi i kekahi (Love one another) – Respect for all of our relations; the value of cultivating relationships; consideration of how your actions affect everyone, including those you don’t know; expansion of life-affirming traditions and ways of knowing;
  •       Mälama i kou kuleana (Take care of your responsibilities) – Taking care of kuleana (responsibilities) at the individual, familial, community, nation/world level; mälama ‘äina, as in actively taking care of the living systems that sustain us; kuleana to transform things that are not pono (good, just, in balance, etc…) at the appropriate time in an appropriate manner;
  •       Kökua aku, kökua mai, pëlä ihola ka nohona ÿohana (Give help, receive help, that is the way of family) – Actively looking for ways to help one another, and allowing yourself to be; interconnectedness of all, in family, in all worlds (physical/spiritual, etc); community empowerment through collaboration;
  •       Mahalo i ka mea loa’a (Be thankful for what we have) – Perpetuation of life-sustaining practices and ancestral knowledge that has been passed down; cultural efficacy; incorporation of ‘Ölelo Hawai`i;
  •       Külia i ka nu’u, i ka paepae kapu ‘o Lïloa (Strive to reach the summit, the sacred platform of Lïloa) – Strive to reach your highest potential; Ethic of seeking excellence; Exhibition of mastery; ‘ike a’o, learning through the process of giving/receiving knowledge, and specifically for teachers, by reflecting, adapting and being flexible in the teaching context;
  •       Ua mau ke ea o ka `äina i ka pono (The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness) – Show respect and love for the Akua, ‘`aumäkua, küpuna, känaka, and the ‘äina; Seek to restore Hawai`i’s sovereignty, including self-determination in education, by living pono and practicing cultural traditions like asking forgiveness, following protocols, and embodying Hawaiian

Program values are assessed using the Kahuale Values Rubric.

Breach of values or code of conduct

Corrective Action

First incidence

Counseling and training/support provided to the student. Student may be required to complete a behavioral contract to change behavior

Second incidence

The student may have scholarship revoked

Third incidence

The student may be suspended from programs and required to competitively reapply if seeking re-entry.

 

Students may appeal decisions using the Kaho’iwai appeals process.

 


 

Student Services

Academic Advising

Students requiring academic advice, assistance with credits, progression, transcript analysis, and program advice can contact the Student Advisor. The advisor will work with you individually to answer whatever questions you may have. Please email Kerri-Ann@kalo.org

Tutoring

There is a range of support options available to students including one-on-one support, online writing support, and APA support. Tutoring is available to students on request. Faculty are available on each island to provide support as required. To access support please contact the student advisor.

Career Services

The majority of students in teacher programs are employed on admission to this program. The few who are in transition can access support with resume writing, interview coaching, and professional advice such as teacher licensing. Kaho’iwai has access to school networks, workforce development support, and job fairs to support students. If you need career services, please contact the program manager. Kaho’iwai does not imply or guarantee employment as a result of this program. Completion of a teacher certification program is a pre-requisite for a teacher license in Hawai’i.

Cultural Support

As a Native Hawaiian organization, students have access to language and culture specialists on campus. Off-campus, Kaho’iwai can refer students to persons and organizations with specialist cultural knowledge as required. Kaho’iwai`s educational philosophy is based on a Hawaiian education framework. The certificate in teaching requires students to work with community programs as service learning to develop local community values.

Student Information and Services

Student information and services are available by calling Kaho’iwai 808-8871117 and by contacting the program manager

Student Responsibilities

Students accepted into an academic program at the institution have certain rights and responsibilities that help to establish a student code of professional conduct. Foremost to this code is student access to a learning environment free from harmful interference.

  1. Students have the right to an objective evaluation of their academic performance.

        Students shall receive the course syllabus outlining the objectives, coursework, and the methods of assessment that determine final            grades by the start of the course.

  1. Students are responsible to actively participate in and complete program requirements.
  2. Students have the right to quality education. This right includes access to and the inclusion of appropriate instructional strategies and methodologies, adequate materials, quality instructors, and a learning environment that stimulates creativity and personal growth.
  3. Students will be treated in a respectful manner conducive to maintaining self-worth, values, and dignity. Students shall be free from verbal, emotional, and physical intimidation, insult, harassment, and aggression.
  4. Students have the responsibility to conduct themselves in a professional manner throughout the program and to abide by the institutional policies.
  5. Students are responsible to practice, uphold, and perpetuate the values representing the institution and programs.
  6. Students will be notified of infractions and have the right to respond to disciplinary sanctions.
  7. Students have the right and responsibility to seek and engage in opportunities that promote personal development.
  8. Students have the right to form and uphold personal perspectives of data or views covered in the course, but they are responsible for learning the academic content presented.
  9. Students have a right and the responsibility to participate in the evaluation of courses and instructors. Students are expected to provide constructive criticism of institution services received.

Student Code of Conduct

It is expected that students will display program values at all times. Behavior that is unacceptable includes academic misconduct (plagiarism, collusion, and cheating), behavior that breaches federal and state laws, and failing to abide by policies applying to KALO such as (but not limited to) use of facilities and services.

Program Values

Aloha kekahi i kekahi (Love one another) – Respect for all of our relations; the value of cultivating relationships; consideration of how your actions affect everyone, including those you don’t know; expansion of life-affirming traditions and ways of knowing;

Mälama i kou kuleana (Take care of your responsibilities) – Taking care of kuleana (responsibilities) at the individual, familial, community, nation/world level; mälama ‘äina, as in actively taking care of the living systems that sustain us; kuleana to transform things that are not pono (good, just, in balance, etc…) at the appropriate time in an appropriate manner;

Kökua aku, kökua mai, pëlä ihola ka nohona ÿohana (Give help, receive help, that is the way of family) – Actively looking for ways to help one another, and allowing yourself to be; interconnectedness of all, in family, in all worlds (physical/spiritual, etc); community empowerment through collaboration;

Mahalo i ka mea loa’a (Be thankful for what we have) – Perpetuation of life-sustaining practices and ancestral knowledge that has been passed down; cultural efficacy; incorporation of ‘Ölelo Hawai`i;

Külia i ka nu’u, i ka paepae kapu ‘o Lïloa (Strive to reach the summit, the sacred platform of Lïloa) – Strive to reach your highest potential; Ethic of seeking excellence; Exhibition of mastery; ‘ike a’o, learning through the process of giving/receiving knowledge, and specifically for teachers, by reflecting, adapting and being flexible in the teaching context;

Ua mau ke ea o ka `äina i ka pono (The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness) – Show respect and love for the Akua, ‘`aumäkua, küpuna, känaka, and the ‘äina;. Seek to restore Hawai`i’s sovereignty, including self-determination in education, by living pono and practicing cultural traditions like asking forgiveness, following protocols, and embodying Hawaiian

Program values are assessed using the Kahuale Values Rubric.

Student Interaction

Student interaction is an important component of the academic and cultural experience at the institution. The academic platforms used throughout the program is designed to encourage student interactions and maximize opportunities for social, academic, and cultural growth. Students are encouraged to participate in study or interest groups.

Personal Appearance

Personal appearance is an important aspect in the development of professional skills. Students are required to dress in an appropriate and professional manner while attending institution events and during program assignments. Professional appearance is an important aspect of demonstrating professional skills. Students are expected to practice good personal hygiene habits and maintain a neat professional appearance at all times.

Administration and faculty are responsible for enforcing the dress code. Any student exhibiting inappropriate personal appearance will be addressed in order to rectify the unacceptable dress code infractions. All students are to dress appropriately for the environment they are in. In school settings, this means following professional dress codes. In outdoor settings, students are to wear protective clothing and footwear to prevent sunburn and other potential injuries.

Intellectual Property Protection and Ownership

Student intellectual and cultural property remains the property of the student. Kaho`iwai does not assume ownership of intellectual or cultural property as a result of participation in this program.

Student Complaint/Grievance Procedure

Introduction

Kaho’iwai is committed to providing an educational climate that is conducive to the personal and professional development of each individual. In order to ensure that commitment, the institution has developed procedures for students to pursue grievances within the institution, should such action become necessary. A student who has an unresolved disagreement has the right to file a written complaint.

Purpose of Policy

The objective of Kaho‘iwai student complaint policy is to resolve concerns as quickly and efficiently as possible at the level closest to the student. A complaint should be filed in writing during the time period of occurrence but no later than 30 days from the first day of the following academic time period.

Scope of Policy

The Kaho’iwai student complaint policy is available to students who wish to have a concern resolved about a person or process of the institution community not covered by existing policies, such as the grading policy, residency policy, student code of conduct policy, etc.

Definitions

Complaints: are defined as any student concern regarding people, institutional programs, services or staff other than those addressed by institutional appeal policies.

Policy Statement

Determination of Appropriate Procedure

If students have any question about the applicable procedure to follow for a particular complaint, they should consult with the program manager. In particular, the program manager should advise a student if some other procedure is applicable to the type of complaint the student has.

Informal Resolution

Students are encouraged to attempt to resolve complaints informally with the faculty member (or other persons) or to seek the assistance of the program manager to facilitate informal resolution.

Formal Complaint

If the student does not pursue informal resolution, or if informal resolution is unsuccessful, the student may file a written complaint with the program manager or, if the program manager is the subject of the complaint, with the VP-Academics. (This person will be referred to below as the “Fact Finder.”)

The complaint shall be filed within 7 calendar days of the alleged conduct unless there is good cause shown for delay, including but not limited to delay caused by an attempt at informal resolution. The complaint shall be as specific as possible in describing the conduct complained of.

The manager shall promptly send a copy to the person about whom the complaint is made, along with a letter stating that the filing of the complaint does not imply that any wrong-doing has occurred and that a faculty member must not retaliate in any way against a student for having made a complaint. If either the student or the faculty member has reason to believe that the manager may be biased or otherwise unable to deal with the complaint in a fair and objective manner, he or she may submit to the VP Academics a written request stating the reasons for that belief; if the request appears to have merit, that person may, in his or her sole discretion, replace the appointed staff member in his/her role.

The manager shall meet with the complaining student and other people, either separately or together, to discuss the complaint and to try to resolve it.

If resolution is not possible, and the manager concludes that the facts alleged by the student, taken as true and viewed in the light most favorable to the student, establish that the conduct complained of is clearly protected by academic freedom, he or she shall issue a written report dismissing the complaint and setting forth the reasons for dismissal and send a copy to the complaining student, the faculty member, and the VP-Academics. Otherwise, the manager shall conduct an investigation.

The manager shall separately interview the complaining student, the other person and other persons with relevant knowledge and information. The manager shall not reveal the identity of the complaining student and the other person to others except to the extent necessary to conduct the investigation. If the manager believes it would be helpful, he or she may meet again with the student and other people after completing the investigation in an effort to resolve the matter. The complaining student and the other person shall have the right to have a representative present during the initial meeting, the interview and any post-investigation meeting.

At the end of the investigation, the manager shall issue a written report setting forth his or her findings and recommendations, with a particular focus on whether the conduct in question is protected by academic freedom, and send a copy to the complaining student, and the other person. In ordinary cases, it is expected that the investigation and written report should be completed within 15 working days of the date the complaint was filed.

Appeals Procedure.

If either the complainant is not satisfied with the outcome or feels there are process issues an appeal may be filed using the Appeals Process.

Policy Application

The policy applies to all students and participants in any Kaho’iwai program. If a student has a complaint about the Kaho’iwai program they can direct their complaint to either the Hawai’i Teacher Standards Board www.HTSB.org or the accreditor.

Review

The VP Academics is responsible for implementing, reviewing and promulgating this policy to all relevant staff. and the students.

Nondiscrimination/Non-Harassment Policy

In terms of discrimination and harassment-All State and Federal laws apply to students, staff, and faculty within Kaho`iwai.

Student Health Services

The institution does not provide student health services. If a medical emergency arises, a designated staff member will call 9-1-1 emergency medical services. Students who require non-medical care will be directed to the appropriate medical agencies or services. Students are responsible for incurred medical costs.

Student Housing

Kaho`iwai offers programs using a hybrid delivery method including short term residentials and online learning. As such, the program does not offer student housing outside of set short term residentials that are promulgated in the enrolment contract.

Technology and Equipment Requirements for Digital Instruction

All students enrolled in Kaho’iwai programs require access to the internet to complete coursework. The required software includes the Microsoft Office suite including MS Word, Excel, and Powerpoint. Students are required to provide their own laptop or computer.

Crime Awareness and Campus Security

Students are to be conscious of their environment. Any situation that poses a risk to personal or material safety is to be reported to a faculty member immediately. Any knowledge of a crime is to be reported to a staff member immediately.

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Awareness and Prevention

The campus and all activities scheduled by Kaho`iwai are drug and alcohol-free. This also applies to all Kaho`iwai activities off-campus. Any exemption to this policy is to be approved by the Kaho’iwai President.

Program Information

Program information is available from any staff or faculty member. Information is also available at www.kahoiwai.kalo.org and on Populi (for students, staff, and faculty).


 

Academic Information

Class Size

Programs are cohort based. Students move through the programs in cohorts. Where possible, Kaho`iwai sets the size of programs to provide peer support and provide an opportunity for learning in a social context. Students are often divided into working groups for academic activities.

Hours of Operation

Normal campus operating hours at Hälau Ho`olako are 9am-5pm Monday to Friday with the exception of State and Public holidays. Instructors will post their availability in their syllabi. Phone inquiries can be made at 808 887-1117.

Definition of an Academic Year

Teacher education cohorts begin in April of each year.

The academic year for post-baccalaureate courses consists of four terms of 13 weeks. Courses are scheduled within this term timeframe. A normal academic year that aligns to grants is from 01 October to September 30.  Each year students can expect the following:

Term 1 (Winter)-January 1 to March 31

Term 2 (Spring)-April 1 to June 30

Term 3 (Summer)-July 1 to September 30

Term 4 (Fall)-October 1 to December 31